PROCESSING

A Solo Show by

OGUZ BUYUKBERBER

in collaboration with

istanbulmuseum.org

Oguz Buykberber is a world-wide known contemporary musician and composer. He is an expert playing bass clarinet and modern music. He has also practiced visual arts throughout his life. He graduated from the most reputable Turkish arts school: The Faculty of Fine Arts of Mimar Sinan University.  After building a strong arts foundation at Mimar Sinan, he moved to Amsterdam and studied bass clarinet in the Amsterdam Conservatory and became a professional in the field.

 

He is a distinguished artist, his music and his art works have a very particular and unique tone.  He is passionate about making art, creating expressions and compositions despite, or maybe because of, his special eye condition.  His art brings to mind the view that it is by

no coincidence that many Great Masters all had a type of visual impairment while creating some of their masterpieces.

 

For example, El Greco suffered from a severe astigmatism, which is the distortion of the eye that stretches the world vertically. Leonardo Da Vinci is believed to have suffered from a type called intermittent exotropia, a condition which causes one or both eyes to turn outward. Rembrandt Van Rijn painted his eyes turning outwards in many of his self-portraits which would be because of a lack of depth perception, also known as stereo blindness. Edgar Degas suffered retinal disease, probably macular degeneration, for nearly half his life. Monet was diagnosed with a nuclear cataract in both eyes in 1912. And Pablo Picasso… He is one of the many artists who had strabismus, which is abnormal alignment of the eyes, and he was able to create amazing pieces of art despite his inability to perceive depth.

 

Genco Gulan, Artist & Founder of Istanbul Contemporary Art Museum, introduced me to Oguz Buyukberber. It was a pleasure to meet the artist and his artworks. It is a rare experience to observe that the artist’s expertise with music is reflected in his visuals, creating a strong sensation.  When I first saw his art works, the first painter who came to mind was Wassily Kandinsky. I was thrilled. It may seem as a stable image from the outside however the longer it is perceived, notes come to the forefront, notes caused by the orchestration of the visuals that found a way and touched my soul, creating a composition of emotions. All put together by the synthesis of colors, lines, and forms in his digital paintings. 

"Processing" is the first online exhibition of the artist, which features the artist’s abstract expressionist digital paintings. The artist also has video art works in this exhibition, in which his unique and profound images are accompanied by live electronic music composed by himself adding to the viewers visual experience.

 

I wanted to interview Oguz Buykberber and learn more about him from his own words. Thus, we could find the opportunity to talk about various subjects such as his creative process, his career and his personal experiences as an artist. 

 

Now I invite you to visit the exhibition and read our interview with Oguz Buyukberber and I hope that this section would be inspiring & stimulating for you as it was for me throughout the conversation.

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" Series of sound and image studies explore the complex and multi layered emotional responses we have that are often conflicting with one or more messages we have ingrained in our minds. Because these messages are often conflicting with each other, the inevitable paradoxical nature of our responses tend to leave us with unrest, and what needs to be processed becomes more than just what triggers us when we react to our response."

Oguz Buyukberber

Video Art

PROCESSING 5620 Oğuz Büyükberber on Modular Synthesizer

Oguz Buyukberber
PROCESSING 5620 Oğuz Büyükberber on Modular Synthesizer
PROCESSING 5620 Oğuz Büyükberber on Modular Synthesizer

PROCESSING 5620 Oğuz Büyükberber on Modular Synthesizer

04:33
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PROCESSING 2406 Oğuz Büyükberber on Modular Synthesizer

PROCESSING 2406 Oğuz Büyükberber on Modular Synthesizer

04:44
Play Video
PROCESSING 2506 Oğuz Büyükberber on Modular Synthesizer

PROCESSING 2506 Oğuz Büyükberber on Modular Synthesizer

04:55
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PROCESSING 2706 Oğuz Büyükberber on Modular Synthesizer

PROCESSING 2706 Oğuz Büyükberber on Modular Synthesizer

03:41
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A Closer Look

Mr. Buyukberber would you like to tell us about how you became an artist? Was there anything that had an influence on you?

 

I don’t even have a memory of when I started drawing. While that’s probably true for most people, I ended up drawing more than most kids do. I did it more than anything else during my childhood, because I couldn’t play most games other kids did. I was born visually impaired, so I drew all day, everyday, sometimes 8 hours straight. 

 

I had as low as 10% total sight, without depth perception. Looking back many years later as a grown up, I realize that drawing functioned as the primary tool for me to learn to see and understand how things work in the world. My mom would let me touch everything in the house or at the grocery store. Without realizing, I was mapping things in my head. As an engineer, my dad taught me to draw perspective when I was six. By the time I was 8, doctors couldn’t explain how I could make the realistic paintings I was making. 

 

I won numerous national and international awards, my paintings joined exhibitions that toured the world and in 1987, I was admitted to Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts with the highest score. 

 

So, I can say that the main influence on me becoming an artist has been my limited eye sight. 

 

After being a successful clarinetist and composer, how did you begin making visual arts again?

 

I never stopped working on my visual art. During my art school studies, music became more and more the primary means of expression for me. This had to do with two things: My desire for “choosing” what I wanted to do (as making art felt like something I’ve always naturally done and haven’t chosen to do), and secondly, the limitations of my art teachers to understand my multi-faceted approach. 

 

As amazed they were about my skills and productive drive, they were frustrated and disappointed to see that I wasn’t going be the next version of themselves. They tried hard, so did I. Nonetheless, I earned my diploma, and went on with my life to became a professional musi